doctor paradox

Showing all posts tagged business:

... for his rallies, maybe, but not for his businesses. It's funny, because Florida has a 5.6% unemployment rate, which is higher than the national average, so you might think some percentage of those domestic unemployed persons might have the skills required to be housekeepers, waters, and cooks... ...but apparently Donald Trump can't find them. Because he needs to hire 78 immigrants for his resort properties. Which seems odd given that his immigration reform platform includes a provision to force American companies to hire from the pool of unemployed domestic labor. If the candidate is as concerned about helping American workers find jobs as he has claimed, he has yet shown no evidence. This indicates either a hollow claim, or a lack of skill in producing the outcome he is promising.
Anti-regulatory sentiment in US politics is a misdirection, because pretty much everybody sane loathes red tape and bureaucracy, but the result of deregulation has been an increase in corporate corruption and white collar crime historically -- without fail -- every time it is implemented. Already the average American citizen is being crushed between the demands of corporate profits (and the financialization engine that feeds on them) on the one hand and government cronyism and partisan gridlock on the other. "Regulation" is just a fancy word for "law," as in, the body of law that has built up over the course of US history and that is widely credited as one of the major sources of US success in the global arena -- without a strong rule of law and the ability to enforce misconduct, we are literally less civilized. All that civilization is, is the set of agreements we hold in common, and pledge in good faith to abide by; the limits on our own personal ego desires we submit ourselves t...
Some interesting visualizations of state by state trends (you can hover over the individual states to get exact counts as a pop-up), via indexmundi: Average commute time by state Looks like NY and DC have the worst of it, with CA, MA, & IL not far behind. New Yorkers are homebodies The map represents people who are living in the same house they were in 12 months ago. Poverty rate by state It would be great if poor Southerners would stop voting against their own economic interest by siding with the GOP, who reels them in with racism while allowing bankers and elites to fleece their constituencies to the bone. Apparently people would rather be hateful but poor than tolerant and better off. Women-owned firms (2007) Black-owned firms (2007) Another data point as to why Black southerners don't trust Bernie Sanders. California got bidness This map shows private, nonfarm private businesses by state. p.s. any ideas how to avoid that framing effect with the embed...
by doctor paradox · December 1, 2014 There’s been a lot of hand-wringing over the fate of journalism, and the ability to monetize content more broadly, for quite some time — and naturally so. The means of production have been democratized; the powers of direct communication have been bestowed upon the masses; and the Big Bang of voluminous content production all shook the web around the same time during the “2.0" era. It was a heady time — Caterina would actually comment on your Flickr photos and Stewart Butterfield was 10 years away from beating VCs away from Slack with a stick. We could all sign up for Blogger or TypePad and have an always-on podium at our disposal for a song — or we could go a little further down the rabbit hole and teach ourselves a little HTML, maybe some CSS, and figure out how to register a domain name and set up a website. For a time you could even find a domain name — it was heaven! (Noting the thankful renaissance / real estate explosion with the ...
by doctor paradox · April 8, 2009 “We’re looking, of course, at ways to extract payments from the consumers of our news — micro-payments, subscriptions, memberships, licensing, even voluntary donations," Bill Keller, executive editor of The Times, said last week in a speech at Stanford University. Time Inc. EVP John Squires used strikingly similar language in a recent statement about figuring out how to “save magazines": these guys are busy scratching their brains about how to “get a payment from a consumer." So what’s missing here? How about any discussion of how to actually provide better value to the consumer? Or perhaps how to reach consumers in the new landscapes they’re inhabiting? Nope. We don’t hear much about that. It’s all fire and brimstone about how consumers have the audacity to skim headlines to absorb the news (did these guys think people read newspapers cover to cover when they come on paper?) or how Google dared to invent a way to find stuff you were look...